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HomeNewsQueensland swimwear brand, Body Juice accused of reselling Shein swimwear

Queensland swimwear brand, Body Juice accused of reselling Shein swimwear

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A Queensland swimwear brand has come under fire for what appears to be an attempt to sell a piece of fast fashion as “luxury and bespoke”.

A customer claims Body Juice, based on the Gold Coast, was caught selling a top from fast-fashion outlet Shein, despite carrying a different branded swing tag that said the piece was “made to order with sustainable fabrics”.

A photo of the mistake was shared by a Reddit user who said their sister had bought the top from a stall at the Surfers Paradise Beachfront Markets.

“She had no idea it was not actually ‘luxury and bespoke’ or any of the other claims stated on the label until we got home to take the tag off,” they wrote.

On its website, the label maintains its pieces are bespoke, customisable and “handmade with love on the Gold Coast Australia”.

The site sells bikinis priced at $99 for a set, or $59 for a separate bottom or top. Customers can also choose the specific cut and colour of their associated style.

“We use only the highest quality Italian fabrics, and our seamless designs are hand cut to hug your curves in all the right ways,” it said.

“As we make to order we can offer you a range of customisable design features, so you get your most perfect fit.”

Under their sustainable measures, the brand claimed that the brand ethos believes in “slow fashion and only producing what you need.”

They also claimed that their styles are made with econyl – a fabric made from recycled nylon waste sourced from landfills and oceans.

Amid the controversy, it appears Body Juice has removed its Instagram profile, while its Facebook profile remains. As it stands the business has not publicly accounted for the mix up, or responded to questions over how they source their designs or fabrics.

‘Incorrect label:’ Owner responds

In a statement to news.com.au, founder of Body Juice, Melanie McMahon said the crop top was incorrectly labelled and said the buyer would be entitled to a full refund.

Ms McMahon confirmed that while all her bikinis are made at her home studio by hand, she also compliments her pieces with coverups bought directly from Indonesia and AliExpress.

“The item in question was a crop top and not my bikinis, which I handmake on the Gold Coast,” she said.

“The item in question was purchased from an online store. I was unaware of its origins as it was not a Shein store.”

Instead, Ms McMahon claims that an “incorrect label” was attached to the shirt, which was eventually sold for $20. In comparison, similar tops on Shein appear to be priced from around$6.49 full price.

While the top was put on sale for $20, crop tops sold on Shein are priced from as little as $7.49.

However, Ms McMahon says other market sellers also source their clothing using this method.

“Many stalls at the market source their products this way,” she said.

“It is not a handmade market.”

Shein: ‘Worst of the worst’

Chinese retailer Shein – where the top at the centre of the controversy was sourced from – has come under fire for allegations of labour abuse, poor quality and unsustainable manufacturing output.

Fashion ratings website, Good On You dubbed Shein as the “worst of the worst”.

“Aside from using a couple of eco-friendly materials here and there, there is no evidence the brand is taking any meaningful action to reduce its substantial impact on the environment,” the site said, giving the brand a score of ‘We Avoid’.

While the clothes are notoriously cheap, questions have been raised over the vast quantities of overstock which is produced by the business which releases around 6000 new styles daily.

The use of polyester is also criticised. Not only is the synthetic fabric resource intensive to produce, the production of the non-biodegradable fabric releases micro-plastics into waterways.

Fashion’s greenwashing problem

Often dubbed as one of the biggest polluters, greenwashing – in which companies exaggerate their environmental, sustainable or ethical efforts – is rife in the fashion industry.

This year, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) announced they were prioritising greenwashing, as consumers become more conscious around the impact of their shopping decisions.

In a statement released in October, ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said at least 200 companies across energy, food, cosmetics and clothing would be reviewed. She also said greenwashing tactics were an example of “manipulative marketing techniques” designed to exploit consumers.

“As consumers become increasingly interested in purchasing sustainable products, there are growing concerns that some businesses are falsely promoting their environmental or green credentials,” she said.

“As consumers become increasingly interested in purchasing sustainable products, there are growing concerns that some businesses are falsely promoting their environmental or green credentials,” she said.

Read related topics:Brisbane

Story Credit: news.com.au

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